Monday, February 27, 2012

SP4 Kevin Hardin, United States Army, Ret.


Kevin Hardin was born February 24, 1986 and passed away on January 24, 2012, at the age of 25.

Kevin proudly served his country in the United States Army from 2007-2009. Kevin suffered severe injuries in Iraq on September 30, 2007 while serving as a Combat Medic. Over the next year plus, he underwent numerous surgeries for those injuries, and was medically retired from the Army in 2009

Kevin's numerous military decorations include the Purple Heart, the Combat Medic Badge, and the Army Achievement Medal.

Kevin's untimely passing is attributed to complications of his injuries and he is another casualty of Operation Iraqi Freedom.

A funeral service was held on January 27, 2012 at Heritage Funeral Home in Harker Heights, Texas. In attendance were the Patriot Guard Riders who formed a line of American flags at the entrance to welcome the arriving family and friends.

After the service, the Riders led the funeral procession to the Central Texas State Veterans Cemetery at Killeen, Texas.

Awaiting at the cemetery were more Patriot Guard Riders and fifty American flags blowing briskly in the southerly wind.

After Kevin's flag draped casket was moved from the hearse to the committal shelter, the Riders formed a line of flags around the cemetery during the service.

United States Army Chaplain Hoos said the final prayers and led the gathering in the Lord's Prayer.

Full military honors were rendered by the Army Honor Guard. The detail of five riflemen fired three volleys of fire representing Duty, Honor and Country. The Army bugler played taps.

The flag that covered the casket was carefully folded into the traditional triangle, passed ceremoniously to an Army Non-Commissioned Officer, and presented to Kevin's dear wife on behalf of a grateful nation and the United States Army as a token of appreciation for Kevin's honorable and faithful service. A second folded flag was presented to Kevin's mother.

Representatives of Gold Star Mothers presented a Gold Star Service Flag to Kevin's mother, in recognition of his death as the result of his military service.

SP4 Kevin Hardin was then laid to rest on the sloping plain of the cemetery as the American flag flew at half-staff in his honor at the top of the hill.

Left to cherish his memory are his wife, his parents, and numerous other dear family and friends. He also left behind his pride and joy - his Red, Shelby Mustang GT.
















http://www.goldstarmoms.com/Resources/ServiceFlags/ServiceFlags.htm

Sunday, February 26, 2012

SSG Marcus Vea, United States Army, Ret.



Marcus Vea was born June 22, 1954 in Watsonville, California and passed away November 27, 2011, at the age of 57, at Fort Hood, Texas.

Marcus proudly served his country in the United States Army for more then twenty years and retired in May 1994. At the time of his death he worked for Northrup Grumman.

A memorial service was held December 5, 2011 at the Crawford-Bowers Funeral Home in Temple, Texas. In attendance were the Patriot Guard Riders who formed a line of American flags at the entrance to welcome the arriving family and friends.

After the service the Riders led the funeral procession to the Central Texas State Veterans Cemetery at Killeen.

At the cemetery, the Riders formed a line of American flags around the committal shelter as the United States Army Catholic Chaplain performed the rite of committal.

The United States Army Honor Guard rendered full military honors. The detail of five rifles fired three volleys of fire, representing Duty, Honor and Country. The Army bugler played taps.

The Honor Guard carefully unfolded the American flag that had rested against the urn, and refolded it into the traditional triangle. The folded flag was passed to a Non-Commissioned Officer who presented it to Marcus' family on behalf of a grateful nation and the United States Army as a token of appreciation for his honorable and faithful service.

The urn containing the cremains of SSG Marcus Vea was then sealed into a niche of the columbarium wall, as his family and friends gathered 'round.

The American flag at the top of the hill above was flying at half-staff in his honor.

Left to cherish his memory are a son, his mother, six sisters, two grand-children and numerous nieces, nephews and cousins.









With thanks to the Killeen Daily Herald for biographical information.
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Tuesday, February 14, 2012

CSM Paul David East, United States Army, Ret.


Paul David East was born May 2, 1948 and passed away November 17, 2011, at the age of 63, at Scott and White Continuing Care.

Paul proudly served his country in the United States Army for over 26 years, during the Vietnam War and Desert Storm. He retired with the rank of Command Sergeant Major. Among his many awards and decorations were the Bronze Star Medal, the Kuwait Liberation Medal and the Meritorious Unit Commendation.

Funeral services were held on November 22, 2011 at the Crawford-Bowers Funeral Home in Killeen. In attendance were the Patriot Guard Riders who formed a line of American flags at the entrance of the funeral home to welcome the arriving family and friends.

After the service, the Riders led the funeral procession to the Central Texas State Veterans Cemetery, just south of Killeen. At the cemetery, the procession was welcomed by fifty American flags flying briskly in the cold northerly wind.

On hand was the United States Army Honor Guard, who moved the flag draped casket from the hearse to the committal shelter. The Riders formed a line of flags around the shelter as final prayers were said.

The Army Honor Guard rendered full military honors. The detail of five rifles fired three volleys of fire, representing Duty, Honor and Country. The Army bugler played taps.

The flag that draped the casket was folded into a tight triangle and ceremoniously passed to an Army Non-Commissioned Officer. He presented the flag to Paul's dearly beloved wife, Catarina, on behalf of a grateful nation and the United States Army as a token of appreciation for Paul's honorable and faithful service.

Command Sergeant Major Paul David East was then laid to rest as the American flag flew at half-staff on the hill above.

Left to cherish his memory are his wife, a son, two step-daughters, a step-son, two sisters and a host of other dear family and friends.




With thanks to Crawford-Bowers Funeral Home for biographical information and additional photo.



Saturday, February 4, 2012

Sgt. Major LeRoy Julius Arnold, United States Army, Ret.


LeRoy Julius Arnold was born September 13, 1932 in Lake Crystal, Minnesota and passed away October 12, 2011 at the age of 79, in Copperas Cove, Texas.

Sgt. Major Arnold proudly served his country in the United States Army from the age of 15, having convinced his uncle to sign for him, when he volunteered during the Korean War. His service spanned 25 years and included guarding freedom and fighting in every conflict his country was involved in during his enlistment. He is lovingly remembered as a patriot, husband, father and committed follower of Jesus Christ. He lived his life by Homer's creed, "His sword the brave man draws and ask no omen but his country's cause."

After retiring from the Army, he moved to Rockford, Illinois, in 1976, and joined the Rockford School District to teach Jr. R.O.T.C.

Sgt. Major Arnold was most proud of his service with the 1st Infantry Division in Vietnam, 1965-1966, where he earned the Combat Infantry Badge and the Army Commendation Medal. He was also awarded the Army Commendation Medal for his service with the 2nd Infantry Division in Korea.

Sgt. Major Arnold became a Christian at the age of 49. He and his wife, Clara, were members of Elim Baptist Church in Rockford. He was known by his friends as a "Packer Backer". He led Promise Keepers meetings in Columbus, Wisconsin and was a Gideon for 28 years.

On October 17, 2011, interment services were held at the Central Texas State Veterans Cemetery at Killeen, Texas. In attendance were the Patriot Guard Riders who formed a line of American flags around the committal shelter during the service.

The minister read from the scripture and said the final prayers. The United States Army Honor Guard rendered full military honors. The detail of five rifles fired three volleys of fire, representing Duty, Honor and Country. The bugler played taps.

The American flag that had draped the coffin was folded into the traditional triangle and presented to Clara on behalf of a grateful nation and the United States Army as a token of appreciation for the honorable and faithful service of Sgt. Major Arnold.

The service concluded with the playing of Amazing Grace by the bag piper.

Sgt. Major LeRoy Julius Arnold was laid to rest on the sloping hillside, as the American flag flew at half-staff in his honor above. Left to cherish his memory are his wife of 61 years, two daughters, two sons, a brother and a sister, nine grandchildren, four great-grandchildren and a host of other dear family and friends.




With thanks to the Crawford-Bowers Funeral Home for biographical information.